#975 – Working together with a friend on a single player puzzle game

2 Mar

I recently got lost in the world that is The Witness. And I mean super lost, I would close my eyes at night only to see puzzles in my dreams (or should I say nightmares). It’s a fantastic game that I’m sure will make an appearance more than once on this list. For the unaware, it’s a puzzle adventure game. The puzzles range from easy to ‘throw the controller across the room’ tough. At least each puzzle, as painstaking as they can be, has a solution. But this solution might never come to your mind, especially when looking at the same puzzle for hours. And here in lies today’s awesome game thing, working or playing together with a friend on a single player puzzle game.

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My buddy Arun came over and we just so happened to tackle some of these puzzles together, and boy I tell you, it makes things more interesting and, at times, easier. You view puzzles at different angles based on a number of criteria; one’s logic, education, sense of perception, etc. No two minds are ever alike and two minds are always better than one (probably didn’t think you’d be reading so many clichés in one blog post today). Yet sometimes those two minds are still not clever enough to figure out a puzzle meaning it’s time for good ol’ fashioned brute force. And with two people, brute forcing is much quicker than on your own.

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As you can see, puzzle games are meant to challenge our brains to think in creative and sometimes illogical ways. But instead of rage quitting because of an impossible puzzle, grab a friend and let them have a crack at it. Leave your pride at the door and work as a team. Believe me, it doesn’t make you any stupider.

AWESOME!

2 Responses to “#975 – Working together with a friend on a single player puzzle game”

  1. pine717 March 2, 2016 at 8:54 pm #

    For whatever reason, puzzle games find a way of invading dreams like no other type of game do. I’ve heard theories that it has to do with how sleep influences the learning process by transferring memory from short-term to long-term.

    • rickytheleaf March 2, 2016 at 9:08 pm #

      That’s extremely interesting and would make a lot of sense if it’s true.

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